The Way, The Truth, The Life
The Way, The Truth, The Life

The Way, The Truth, The Life

The Way, The Truth, The Life

We were on our way back from an early morning fly-fishing trip. It was a productive morning, both of us having caught some fish, returning refreshed from the cool mountain water and air. In the relaxed atmosphere of the single cab Chevy, the conversation turned toward spiritual matters. He, the philosophical skeptic, pondered aloud the meaning of life. I mentioned how knowing Jesus personally has given me purpose and meaning in life. His response was typical of one you might hear these days, “Yes, Jesus had a lot of great things to say, a great moral teacher.” I pushed back by sharing from my own journey. “True, He did have a lot of great things to say, but He also had some crazy things to say. For instance, I really had to wrestle with His statement, “I am THE way, THE Truth, and THE life, no one comes to the Father except through me.” That’s a pretty bold claim that doesn’t leave any middle room.”

His response caught me off guard. I expected more philosophical counter points, more evidential arguments, but he simply said in a hushed tone, “I guess He really did say that… He really said that.” We mostly sat in a pondering silence for the rest of the drive, allowing space for him to process this confronting concept.

The Power of the Personal

A couple of things have always stood out to me about this interaction. One is the power of sharing how Christ has worked in your life personally. We can deal all day in philosophical arguments, and those definitely can be helpful, but I’ve found a powerful starting point to be rooted in the change Christ has personally made in your own life.

The other was the reality of being confronted with the challenging truth of Christ’s claim: He is the way and there is no other. That is one of the most offensive statements you can make in our culture, and yet it is central to our faith. Christ says to follow Him means to exclude all others, just as a marriage requires you put aside all former romances.

The passage I quoted to my fellow fisherman, John 14:6, falls in the middle of the passage we’re studying this Sunday, John 13:36-14:11. Carve out some time to read over the passage before Sunday. John 14:6 will also be our memory verse for October. (Last Sunday’s sermon was on Psalm 91 – take time to re-read it as well.)

Whether in a truck cab after a fishing trip, or on a neighbor’s front porch, my prayer is that God would open doors for you to talk about this verse in the coming months as we seek to reach out to our communities all over Southwest Louisville.

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